Mental Health Month

By Vera Lloyd

Take care of yourself during National Mental Health Month

by Cynthia Polk, Director, Laurence E. Schmidt Counseling Center

May is National Mental Health Month. Our mental well-being is a component of overall positive health. Life can get so busy juggling extra responsibilities and stressors. When it becomes excessive to the point of negatively influencing every day functioning, it may be time to consider seeing a counselor/therapist. Work, school, family life and other relationships can be impacted by unresolved stress.

According to a recent article in the Journal of Counseling Psychology (2016), many stigmas exist about seeking mental health counseling. A therapist? But I am not “crazy!” Other resistant mindsets include being strongly motivated to protect self-concept, minimizing issues, gender resistance, family, friend and co-worker attitudes, seeing it as a sign of weakness, being worried about confidentiality and not believing it will be effective.

Think of it as another confidante (who will not tell your business) and will provide advice and suggestions to promote positive living. Therapy can also promote improved inner peace, help identify goals, assist with learning new patterns of behavior, clarify the thoughts and feelings of self and others, and provide an impartial sounding board and a safe and friendly ear. 

If you are someone you know is feeling overwhelmed with life, I encourage them or yourself to make an appointment to see a licensed professional counselor. 

Lannin, D.G., Vogel, D. L., Brenner, R. E., Abraham, W.T., & Heath, P.J. (2016). Does self-stigma reduce the probability of seeking mental health information? Journal of Counseling Psychology: (63): 3-351-358.